Head Wobble in dog

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Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 21:32

Post Number:#1

Ok so this has happened before but the vet said she had a sore neck, massage and heat pack.
But tonight Cassie was scared... I have never seen her look like that.

I'm busy working from home and glance up to see Cassie standing at the door, her head wobbling uncontrollably.
I go out side and she comes to me when I asked her too with a very stressed/frightened look on her face. Her head wobbling and her back hunched and her tail tucked right under her.

I did what i Did last time it happened and supported her head however the wobble got worse. I made her lie down which she did and she by herself rolled onto her back. I continued to support her head/neck. speaking calmly to her and trying to make her relax and calm down. This went on for about 30 secs before she relaxed and the wobble stopped. She was fully conscious and was coherent enough to understand commands. I have since bought her inside with me and she is lying on her mat not quite herself (she seems restless, unable to get comfortable) but alert and wanting attention.

Has anyone got any insights into this??? its only happened a handful of times not even that. her back and neck muscles do feel very tense and she hasn't been herself the last few days, she has been very tired, wanting to sleep with me on the bed. I had to wake her to put her outside this morning.
she's about 6 and a half years in age...
Vet check in May was all good, vet very happy and her heart murmur hadn't changed. No vomitting, or diahorria. she ate a few slices of bread yesterday that the OH left out but nothing out of the ordinary...
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Netty
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 22:41

Post Number:#2

No bloody idea here Netty, but I hope you get some answers soon! :twohug
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 22:58

Post Number:#3

Very common in dogs, Netty. If this is the first time she has done it, yeah it would have freaked her out. Some dogs can go through a stage where it happens, then it ceases to ever happen again. Other dogs once started continue it to varying degrees throughout their lives.
One of the best ways to bring a dog out of it is to distract them, as crazy as that sounds.

If I have understood her symptoms correctly, the head bobbing looks kind of like those toy dogs that used to be all the rage - ppl would put them on the back dashes of their cars and as the car moved the head of the dog statue would wobble around from side to side. Is that what Cassie is doing?
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:02

Post Number:#4

You don't think it could be seizure activity, DA?

ETA: I've not recognised this as something that is common in dogs. Any links to information on what and why, per chance?
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:09

Post Number:#5

Yes, it could very well be, SR.
But to my knowledge scientists and vets are still a hung jury on this one. Some believe all head bobbing is a mini-seizure of some sort; others believe it is more psychological than medical. I think perhaps both theories could be correct at any given time, for individual dogs. What I do believe is that a large % of dogs who develop head bobbing go on to lead lengthy and normal lives, other than this issue.
Often it doesn't affect them at all after the initial few, and is more of a concern for the owners than the dogs.

That's iF the description Netty has given IS what I'm picturing it as, though.
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:11

Post Number:#6

Thanks for the explanation - hadn't heard of it before.

Devils Advocate wrote:That's iF the description Netty has given IS what I'm picturing it as, though.


That's the hard part. What we picture isn't necessarily what the originator is drawing.

Good luck, Netty. I hope Cassie is all ok and that it's nothing to be overly concerned about.
If you talk to a dog in words he has learnt to understand, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - An adaptation of a Nelson Mandela quotation
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:18

Post Number:#7

That's exactly it DA. I thought seizure too but she was coherent and focused.
I think Shar had the same issue with one of her dogs and distraction works.

She's currently lying stretched out on the couch asleep. She ate her dinner seems fine just a little off...

Has only started occurring since the pancreatitis. Tonight wasn't the first time...

Can stress set it off????
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:19

Post Number:#8

Silent Raindrops wrote:Thanks for the explanation - hadn't heard of it before.

Devils Advocate wrote:That's iF the description Netty has given IS what I'm picturing it as, though.


That's the hard part. What we picture isn't necessarily what the originator is drawing.


Very true. One can't mistake the head bobbing if they compare it to those toy head bobbing dogs. If it's NOT like that, then it's not what I'm referring to.
To explain further SR, the reason those vets who do believe it is pschological rather than medical is because it is weird how many dogs who suffer from this can be "switched off" from it (for want of a better explanation) by a distraction such as a treat, or even just calling the dog's name and showing it something. Some ppl have even had success with clapping their hands. Those vets don't believe that result would be capable if the dog was under-going a seizure, no matter how low the level.

Perhaps like everything else the truth is somewhere in the middle between both fields?
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:23

Post Number:#9

Refer attached video footage contained in the attached link (scroll down). Is that what you mean, Netty?

http://alexadry.hubpages.com/hub/Head-bobbing-in-dogs
If you talk to a dog in words he has learnt to understand, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - An adaptation of a Nelson Mandela quotation

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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:25

Post Number:#10

You know maybe it's like um... Is it huntingtons disease in humans. That's a neurological thing. The uncontrolsble shakIng...
What I can say is Cassie really doesn't want to shake her head now. She will but she seems very reluctant too...
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:27

Post Number:#11

Pancreatitis? Can that cause low blood sugar? Could that be the cause of Cassie's head bobbing episodes?
If you talk to a dog in words he has learnt to understand, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - An adaptation of a Nelson Mandela quotation
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Silent Raindrops
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:27

Post Number:#12

Netty wrote:You know maybe it's like um... Is it huntingtons disease in humans. That's a neurological thing. The uncontrolsble shakIng...
What I can say is Cassie really doesn't want to shake her head now. She will but she seems very reluctant too...


Parkinsons?
If you talk to a dog in words he has learnt to understand, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - An adaptation of a Nelson Mandela quotation
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:30

Post Number:#13

Silent Raindrops wrote:Refer attached video footage contained in the attached link (scroll down). Is that what you mean, Netty?

http://alexadry.hubpages.com/hub/Head-bobbing-in-dogs


Yep that almost exact. Cassie's had a little more roating in it but close enough.

Interesting that article mentions low glucose levels... She picked up after she had eaten... Hmmmmmmmm!!! That explains a few things....
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:33

Post Number:#14

Thanks sr Parkinson's is what i meant... It's late...

Hmm maybe it is low glucose... I shall monitor!!!!! Low glucose also makes u tired... Might change her food a bit!
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:36

Post Number:#15

I don't have experience with Pancreatitis. Careful of how you change diet and with what, Netty. A blood test shows up blood sugar levels, although I don't know how quickly they can go from imbalance back to balance.
If you talk to a dog in words he has learnt to understand, that goes to his head. If you talk to him in his language, that goes to his heart. - An adaptation of a Nelson Mandela quotation
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
13 Aug 2012, 23:39

Post Number:#16

Netty wrote:That's exactly it DA. I thought seizure too but she was coherent and focused.
I think Shar had the same issue with one of her dogs and distraction works.

She's currently lying stretched out on the couch asleep. She ate her dinner seems fine just a little off...

Has only started occurring since the pancreatitis. Tonight wasn't the first time...

Can stress set it off????


Yes, it did indeed occur with one of Shar's dogs. Freaked her out, as it would! Perhaps you could talk to her about it, as she and I and another lady (who also had experience with it, I believe) had a lengthy conversation about it, and to my knowledge she then coped with it like the trooper she is. One woman had success with giving honey because she believed her dog's episodes were brought on by low sugar. Another's dog only did it when they were being asked to do something they weren't wanting to do - so that owner naturally put stress reaction down as the trigger. That is a small example of why I honestly do feel that the triggers can be different for each dog.

Yeah, stress could set it off I'm sure, as can the onset of a disease or episode of one, such as diabetes - yet in others the set-off is completely baffling - like there isn't any. Not one that is obvious, anyway.
I would strongly suggest you talk to your usual vet about it when next you are in there. Will be interesting and informative to hear about their take on it. Knew a few owners whose vets told them their dog really should be PTS now that it was head-bobbing. Man, talk about an over-reaction!
I think with Shar (don't quote me cause I can't remember fully) she went to the vet to have her dog checked over so everything else could at least be crossed off the list.
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
14 Aug 2012, 00:32

Post Number:#17

I am so sorry that Cassie and you are going through this. I have never heard of it and I am grateful for the education on it and the wealth of knowledge of members on the forum.
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
17 Aug 2012, 19:44

Post Number:#18

I'm a bit late into the discussion but friends' dog developed a kind of occasional "bobbing" of the head after he was diagnosed with Cushings Disease - he's an elderly maltese type and it doesn't adversely affect him, just thought I'd mention it. Cassie obviously is distressed by her "wobbles" so probably completely different, however any theories are always worth discussing with your vet. Give Miss Cassie a hug from me please!
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Re: Head Wobble in dog
17 Aug 2012, 20:28

Post Number:#19

On a lighter note Netty, I knew one owner who changed their dog's name to Stevie. They reckoned that once the head bobbing started the dog reminded them of Stevie Wonder all the time. Lol. (Yes, true story.)
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